The verb ‘to be’ has been removed from this article.

 

Can you add the verb ‘to be’ and make it like the original article?

 

The Princes in the Tower _____ two members of the fifteenth century Royal Family in England who disappeared in 1483.

The eldest _____ Prince Edward, Prince of Wales. He was twelve years old when his father, Edward IV, died. Edward V _____ now the King.

Many people did not trust his mother’s family and thought that they would ______ dangerous if they became too powerful.

Edward and his mother’s family _______ travelling to London. Edward ______ going to be made King of England. In the small village of Stoney Stratford a group of men on horses stopped them.

Where ______ you going?” they asked.

We ______ taking the King to London,” replied Lord Gray, Edward’s uncle on his mother’s side.

To the front of the group came Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the dead king’s brother and the Prince’s uncle.

The boy ______ coming with me. He _______ taken to London by our party. You _____ under arrest.”

Richard promised to protect Edward. Richard would _____ Lord Protector and rule England until Edward _____ eighteen years old.

The public ______ happy. They trusted Richard.

Then, in July, Richard changed his mind. “I _____ the true King of England,” he claimed. “Prince Edward _______ the legitimate King.”

These days it seems possible that Richard ______ right, because Edward ______ probably a bastard. But in 1483 everybody ______ shocked by his claims. People _____ _____ preparing for the coronation of King Edward V, and suddenly they had to prepare for the coronation of Richard III.

The young Edward V, otherwise known as Prince Edward, ______ staying in the Tower of London with his ten year-old brother, Richard of York. They ______ often seen playing in the gardens.

Then, after a month, the two Princes were seen no more. Rumours started up that they _____ _____ killed by Richard III. The country _____ in a civil war called ‘The Wars of the Roses’, and he _____ worried that the Princes could be used against him by his enemies.

Richard never spoke about the Princes, but Londoners were convinced that he ______ to blame for their deaths.

In 1485 King Richard _____ killed in battle, by a new King – Henry VII. Some people think that Henry could ______ ______ the boys’ killer. If they _____ still alive, they _____ _____ ____ a threat to him.

In the year 2033, it _____ _______ _______550 years since the Princes disappeared. In Westminster Abbey there are bones which some think belong to the Princes, but there ______ plenty of doubts. Nobody knows who the killer _____, though Richard _____ the most likely killer.

In 2012 Richard’s body ______ found beneath a car park in Leicester. The search ______ paid for by supporters of Richard. One of them, Philippa Langley, ______ present when Richard’s bones _______ discovered.

I don’t think he killed the Princes,” she said. “_____ not convinced. Are you telling me that an intelligent man, a religious man trusted by everybody who knew him, would kill two innocent children? ______ _______ studying this man’s life for forty years, and I don’t think he _____ a killer.”

Some common forms of ‘to be’:

PAST

was

was being

wasn’t being

were

were being

weren’t being

wasn’t

weren’t

had been

had been being

hadn’t been

PRESENT

am (or I’m)

is (or he’s / she’s / David’s etc.)

are (or they’re)

am not (or I’m not)

is not (or isn’t)

are not (or aren’t / they’re not)

is being

are being

isn’t being

aren’t being

has been

hasn’t been

have been (or I’ve been etc.)

haven’t been

has been being

have been being

FUTURE

will be

will not be (or won’t be)

will have been

will not have been (or won’t have been)

will be being

CONDITIONALS

could be / couldn’t be

would be / wouldn’t be

could have been / couldn’t have been

would have been / wouldn’t have been

was going to

were going to

The verb ‘to be’ – ANSWERS

 

The verb ‘to be’ has been removed from this article.

 

Can you add the verb ‘to be’ and make it like the original article?

 

The Princes in the Tower were two members of the fifteenth century Royal Family in England, who disappeared in 1483.

The eldest was Prince Edward, Prince of Wales. He was twelve years old when his father, Edward IV, died. Edward V was now the King.

Many people did not trust his mother’s family and thought that they would be dangerous if they became too powerful.

Edward and his mother’s family were travelling to London. Edward was going to be made King of England. In the small village of Stoney Stratford a group of men on horses stopped them.

Where are you going?” they asked.

We are taking the King to London,” replied Lord Gray, Edward’s uncle on his mother’s side.

To the front of the group came Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the dead king’s brother and the Prince’s uncle.

The boy is coming with me. He will be taken to London by our party. You are under arrest.”

Richard promised to protect Edward. Richard would be Lord Protector and rule England until Edward was eighteen years old.

The public were happy. They trusted Richard.

Then, in July, Richard changed his mind. “I am the true King of England,” he claimed. “Prince Edward isn’t the legitimate King.”

These days it seems possible that Richard was right, because Edward was probably a bastard. But in 1483 everybody was shocked by his claims. People had been preparing for the coronation of King Edward V, and suddenly they had to prepare for the coronation of Richard III.

The young Edward V, otherwise known as Prince Edward, was staying in the Tower of London with his ten year-old brother, Richard of York. They were often seen playing in the gardens.

Then, after a month, the two Princes were seen no more. Rumours started up that they had been killed by Richard III. The country was in a civil war called ‘The Wars of the Roses’, and he was worried that the Princes could be used against him by his enemies.

Richard never spoke about the Princes, but Londoners were convinced that he was to blame for their deaths.

In 1485 King Richard was killed in battle, by a new King – Henry VII. Some people think that Henry could have been the boys’ killer. If they were still alive, they would have been a threat to him.

In the year 2033, it will have been 550 years since the Princes disappeared. In Westminster Abbey there are bones which some think belong to the Princes, but there are plenty of doubts. Nobody knows who the killer is, though Richard was the most likely killer.

In 2012 Richard’s body was found beneath a car park in Leicester. The search was paid for by supporters of Richard. One of them, Philippa Langley, was present when Richard’s bones were discovered.

I don’t think he killed the Princes,” she said. “I’m not convinced. Are you telling me that an intelligent man, a religious man trusted by everybody who knew him, would kill two innocent children? I’ve been studying this man’s life for forty years, and I don’t think he was a killer.”

 

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